interface to go:
step.by.step
    Walking
is an original form of narrative; of telling a story by retracing steps and, thus, forming metaphors for life... "the journey, slips, stumbles and falls ... the road to ruin, the steady pace, the obstacle, the high road, the primrose path, the downward spiral, the uphill struggle, the long day´s journey into night." R.Solnit

Unlike libraries, schools, churches and many other social structures, museums are one of the few institutions, which encourage and depend on movement and in particular, on walking. As Rebecca Solnit has suggested, walking is an original form of narrative; of telling a story by retracing steps and, thus, forming metaphors for life... "the journey, slips, stumbles and falls ... the road to ruin, the steady pace, the obstacle, the high road, the primrose path, the downward spiral, the uphill struggle, the long day´s journey into night." The structured walk from work of art to work of art, from station to station of artists´ imaginations, is the central narrative of a museum - a walk which reiterates the story of art and of the time of its creation. (...)

Walking is, paradoxically, the mode of "seeing" works of art, and not surprisingly, it is an art motif in and of itself, which is rich and engaging, having various meanings through artists´ investigations of it. Walking had a complex iconography within traditional art history - romanticism in particular - and its semantic richness has continued to be explored in contemporary artworks which emphasize either the museum itself, the subject of walking or through objects which affect the walks of the spectator by various physical interventions. Awareness of the body´s habitual rhytms is the central sign of this exhibition section.

Knud W. Jensen "The Ideal Museum. Wanted: Qualified Utopias". Centre Pompidou, 1979.